Riverland Professionals Series – Elyse Steed

I am asked on a daily basis for referrals to other professionals in the area. This is the second in a series of blog posts dedicated to professionals around the Riverland, whose skills and qualifications complement services received at Santosha.

For our next profile, I am pleased to introduce Elyse Steed, physiotherapist. Elyse is the owner of Just Move Physio in Renmark. Elyse and I share many mutual patients and while I haven’t personally had an appointment with her (yet!), the feedback I receive from her approach is constantly positive.


What is your profession? What areas do you have qualifications and training in? 

I’m a Physiotherapist, I did my Bachelor of Physiotherapy at UniSA between 2006 and 2009.

Sine then I’ve done lots of different professional development courses in Australia and in the UK based on my clinical interests of orthopedic rehabilitation, persistent pain and running training.

Most of my extra manual therapy courses have been in light touch techniques Strain Counter Strain and more recently Craniosacral Therapy.

What does your job involve on a daily basis?

In the morning I always start by getting my outside waiting room ready and path tidied up ready for the day. This is followed by general admin jobs like checking emails/messages, reconciling, returning phone calls and juggling client appointments around.

Then I’ll have my list of clients for the day, which can vary hugely depending on who is in. My time with clients generally consists of listening/interviewing them in regards to their complaint followed by a physical assessment before treatment. I place a huge emphasis on education as part of my treatment so I spend a lot of time explaining things to people, at the moment I’m loving my new anatomy app or Explain Pain to do this. After education treatment time will usually involve manual therapy and exercise prescription.

During my breaks and end of day there’s always case notes to be done which are definitely the worst part of the job.

How did you become interested in Physiotherapy?

I decided I wanted to be a Physio in year 8 due to visiting the physio several times with my own sports injuries. I thought it would be pretty good to be the person who helps people get back to sport. Before getting to uni I wasn’t really aware of how big the profession was outside of sport because that was my only experience.

What is your biggest life achievement?

At this stage I’m most proud that Jack and I took the plunge to pack up here in Renmark and head away on our year long adventure in Europe, where we travelled and worked in our professions. It’s probably the riskiest and most challenging things I’ve done, but the learning that came from it has had such a huge influence on me as a person and professional.

What is one thing you can help clients with (that the general population may not realise)?

Ooh tough one, for me probably that I can help them to understand their pain and how things other than mechanical loading affect it. I spend a lot of time explaining how stress affects pain; I believe that understanding is a really powerful tool to managing you own body.

Where are you located?

I work from my home clinic Just Move Physio at 536 Kulkyne Street, Renmark West. It’s really cool because I have a lovely bright space in the clinic but I’ve also got heaps of outside space where I can observe and retrain people to move which is so important.

What do you enjoying doing in your spare time?

I love to be outdoors, especially in my garden or on my bike. I have an 8 month year old puppy so I spend a lot of time walking her now. I’ve always been involved in netball and basketball but that’s just finished so I might get a bit of free time. Most of my family is here or in Adelaide and I’m very lucky that I see a lot of them too.

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Recipe – Switchel, A Refreshing Summertime Drink

Switchel is an old-fashioned drink, the origins of which are hard to pinpoint. Dairy farmers in Vermont in the US, the Caribbean or Amish communities? Either which way it doesn’t matter to me. One batch and I’m hooked!

The health benefits of each ingredient are listed below the recipe, however at first glance the mix is full of electrolytes, great for digestion, refreshing, anti-inflammatory and delicious!

I liked the sound of it so much that I made a double batch straight away.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup Apple Cider Vinegar (make sure it has ‘the mother’)
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup (or honey)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger (2 tsp ground ginger)
  • Pinch of salt
  • ½ lemon (cut into quarters)

Method

  1. In a clean jar (approximately 1 litre) mix together the vinegar, maple syrup, ginger and salt.
  2. Squeeze the lemon quarters into the jar and then drop lemons into the mix.
  3. Fill to 1 litre with water and refrigerate for at least four hours (or overnight).
  4. Remove and discard the lemon.
  5. You can either shake the grated ginger and drink, or allow it to settle to the bottom.
  6. Drink on its own, with mixed with soda water for a refreshing beverage, or topped up with hot water for a warm cup of tea.

* Make sure you rinse your mouth out with water after finishing. The acidity of the vinegar may affect tooth enamel.

🍏 Apple cider vinegar has a myriad of benefits. Most of these benefits are from anecdotal reports, but still there are too many of them to ignore. Some of these benefits include: relief from heartburn and reflux, improved digestion and reduced bloating, constipation relief, reduced muscle stiffness, balanced blood sugar levels and more.

🔥 Ginger is also well-known for its healing properties. Most of all, it is anti-inflammatory and very settling for the stomach, used often in nausea relief, morning sickness, seasickness and the like.

🍯 Maple syrup and honey may be high in sugar, in their pure form (unheated, untreated) they contain many beneficial vitamins and minerals. Honey is also antibacterial.

🍋 Lemons are high in vitamin C, an antioxidant important for good health and wellbeing, and also potassium. They are alkaline when inside the body. Alkaline foods are important to reduce acidity which is responsible for many of our diseases such as cancer and arthritis. Liminoids (beneficial chemicals) in citrus also have anti-cancer properties.

🌊 Salt has had a bad rap in recent times. Truth is we need a bit of salt. Good quality, well-sourced, unrefined salt contains trace minerals and electrolytes which are essential for all functions of the human body, including but not limited to the immune system, hormones for your thyroid, adrenal gland and reproduction and also brain function.

Make it today!

I highly suggest you make a batch. It may become your favourite summertime drink! Apple cider vinegar is always available in the Santosha clinic. We also stock locally sourced honey, sometimes good quality salt (but can order in if it’s not on the shelf), organic ginger is available at our local Foodland and lemons, well lemons grow on trees!

Let me know what you think.

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Are you a ping-pong ball or a bubble in the bath?

 A bit of science to start:

Each one of the cells that makes up your body has a membrane, that separates its insides from its outsides. Just like your skin. The fancy name for this membrane is the “Phospholipid bi-layer” or “Lipid bilayer”. This means two layers (bilayer) of fat (lipid). This is what keeps the innards in and outside stuff out.

This is why fat in our diet is essential. Each of our cells; brain cells (most importantly), skin cells, stomach lining cells, blood vessel cells, everything, is made of this. Without these fats, we don’t have enough building blocks for our membranes.

Bring in the metaphors

Imagine you’re building a house. The pallets of bricks have arrived. They all look the same. But there is one dodgy pallet. A cheap and nasty variety that has bricks that are an uneven size and shape, completely different to the other pallets. Would you build your house with them? Or send them back and get the same good quality bricks?

What about working on a team project? Everyone has the same idea, everyone is working cooperatively to hold the project together. Then there’s this one person. One person who doesn’t want to fit with the team, who wants to be different, who wants to hold their own shape. Don’t get me wrong, being unique is great. But sometimes we just need to fit in.

This non-team-player and those dodgy bricks, they are the trans fats of our cells. They let the whole process down with their poor quality, non-conformist shape.

 

How this affects your health

Transfats are a different shape to the healthy “phospholipids” that make up the bilayer that holds our cells together. Transfats straighten out due to the heat they are subjected to during processing. Healthy phospholipids are wiggly. The straight transfats make the membrane of the cell rigid. When they replace too many fat molecules in our cells, the cells become more like ping pong balls, holding their shape. They are stiff and rigid and not conducive to good health.

 

This is quite different to the normal and healthy fat molecules that make up our cells. They have wiggly tails and this makes our cells fluid and supple and they are able to conform to the shape they need to be. They are like bubbles in the bath.

The trouble is, our body doesn’t know the difference between the good quality and the bad quality. Our bodies are amazingly clever, but not so much in this case.These rigid-cell-forming lipids are then integrated into our cells changing the quality of our cell structure and it can’t be trusted to work to its optimum potential.

 

What do trans fats do? (The big picture)

Trans fats raise your bad (LDL) cholesterol levels, they increase your risk of developing heart disease and they are associated with type II diabetes. They cause inflammation, pain and general poor health.

 

What to look out for

Companies don’t want you to know their product contains trans fat, or you wouldn’t buy it would you? So trans fats like sugar and MSG are labelled as all sorts of weird and wonderful things. Here is a short list:

  • Partially hydrogenated [insert type of oil here] oil
    • It may be soybean, coconut, palm, etc.
  • Hydrogenated oil
  • Shortening
  • “Zero trans fats” – most likely a marketing lie that gets stamped on the front of the packet

Things you may buy, that won’t come with labels:

  • Any deep fried foods (chips, fish, doughnuts, etc.)
  • Baked goods/Bakery foods – cakes, biscuits, pastries, crackers
  • Flavoured or buttered popcorn
  • Margarine (comes with a label but should not be sold as ‘food’, probably should be sold at Bunnings as plastic)

In general, this means packaged, processed or fast food.

So you see, it’s not just the fat or sugar that’s in these products, it’s the type of fat that contributes to poor health in a far worse way that some people realise.

Heating oil with a low smoke point such as olive oil turns those oils into trans-fats too. Plant based oils such as olive, avocado, macadamia or hemp, should only be used fresh on salads or poured in after food has been taken off the heat.

 

How to avoid trans fats

Like any dietary advice, focussing on real, unprocessed, fresh foods is your best option. This includes fresh fruit and vegetables, nuts and seeds, well-sourced meats and lots of filtered water.

If you must enter a bakery, fresher options such as a salad roll will be better for you. Just make sure you skip on the margarine. All fast foods chain stores are loaded with trans fats, so let’s be honest, it should only be a rare occurrence, if at all.

When doing the grocery shopping, avoiding supermarkets as much as possible helps. Meat from the butcher, fruit and veg from the local fruit and veg shop.

Snacks are a big source of trans-fat containing foods, so planning ahead with healthier snack options helps:

  • Vegetable sticks and home made dips
  • Bliss balls
  • Nuts, seeds and dried fruit (keep dried fruit minimal as it is high in sugar)

Cooking with oils with a higher smoke point which include:

  • Real butter
  • Ghee (butter with the milk solids taken out)
  • Coconut oil

And using plant based oils such as olive and hemp oil at room temperature only.

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My Top Cafes in Adelaide

Changing your diet and habits is always tough. When a practitioner advises, “I would like you to avoid gluten, dairy and refined sugar for the next six weeks,” it can mean big changes. Planning meals at home and changing the contents of the pantry is a good start.

Quite often eating at home is the easy bit though. Going out to eat is different. Living in the Riverland we are limited in our options for allergen friendly take away or eating out foods. That’s a blog for another day. Heading to Adelaide for holidays, shopping or visiting family is the other time where many of my patients find it difficult to stick to these changes.

It is for this reason; I have put together a list of my favourite 5 cafes around Adelaide, in no particular order. I have tried to supply my favourite places in different directions of the city, so no matter where you’re going, it’s not too far out of the way.


Nutrition Republic Goodwood

Nutrition Republic

Goodwood

It’s hard not to leave this place a little happier than when you walked in. Oh, and feeling a little healthier too.

The atmosphere is upbeat, everyone is friendly and the selection of breakfast, brunch, lunch and snack options includes something for everyone.

Everything on the menu is made with high-quality ingredients and many of them are organic. It’s also a place where you don’t have to worry about sneaky gluten or other allergens making their way into your food.

There is outdoor and indoor seating. While they are a busy little place, I’ve never had trouble finding a table.

Great for: breakfast, brunch, lunch, snacks, coffee, whenever

You have to try: Earth Bowls, there are three flavours and I love them all

Why go here: They will convince you that healthy food can also be delicious

#glutenfree #dairyfree #greatcoffee #organic #greatservice


Organic Market and Cafe Stirling

Stirling Organic Café and Market

Stirling

Always a hive of activity, this café (with a store out the back) is a little gem in the Adelaide Hills. They are constantly busy, so I have never experienced the personalised service of some of the other cafes in this list, but that doesn’t mean they are unfriendly.

To be honest I have mostly visited during wintery drives around the hills. It’s a nurturing place to stop for a soup and a nice hot coffee, but I’m sure it’s just as refreshing in Summer as it is cosy in Winter.

The menu is seasonal, so you’ll have to drop in and see what’s available. All food is prepared daily in the kitchen along with cakes, breads and pastries from local artisan kitchens.

Great for: lunch, coffee, dessert, snacks, shopping

You have to try: I can’t say…it changes ALL the time. But I did have a really nice ABC cake once. Almond, basil and citrus. I have recreated this many time at home. A delicious combination.

Why go here: The homely feel you get when you walk in. You can also peruse the store out the back

#local #wholefoods #artesian #glutenfree #dairyfree


Argo on the Parade

Argo on The Parade

Norwood

When I lived in Adelaide, this was a little post-yoga favourite with my cousin and I. Back then we always had bacon and eggs with avocado on sour dough. A recent trip while strictly gluten-free and dairy-free actually made me appreciate the extent of their menu. It was huge! Every dietary need is catered for with countless breakfasts, brunches and lunches; pages of smoothies and juices, a fridge with bliss balls, salads and more; non-dairy milk options for coffee; and a great philosophy to go with it. Make sure you read their background at the start of the menu.

Great for: breakfast, brunch, lunch, snacks, coffee, whenever!

You have to try: Sucré-Salé smoothie

Why go here: I have never seen a bigger selection of allergen friendly foods…actually I’ve never seen a bigger menu

#glutenfree #dairyfree #paleo #healthy #greatcoffee #wholefoods


The Cooks Pantry

A Cook’s Pantry

Grange

Down at Grange, this is a great little café perfectly positioned for some good eats, a coffee, then a walk along the beach.

The menu isn’t huge, but the delicious options still make it hard to choose. They have a focus on organic, local and fresh, just the way I like it! They use McWerriton Farm free-range eggs and Paris Creek biodynamic dairy products.

As well as the breakfasts and lunches, they have a great selection of juices and smoothies.

While not gluten-free, they do bake the bread themselves using organic flours, some with spelt. There are gluten-free options.

The other novel thing about the Cook’s Pantry is the cooking classes. While I’ll never had the opportunity to participate if they’re food philosophy (and taste!) is anything to go by, I imagine they’re pretty good.

The only down side is they’re not open Sundays, which is a crime for a café so close to the beach. I think they would do a great trade on Sundays, with people going for a leisurely Sunday stroll on the beach, but perhaps that’s just me!

Great for: Coffee, brunch, paired with a short walk to the beach

You have to try: Grilled Fig and Walnut Bread!

Why go here: It’s not far from the beach, so after your Fig and Walnut bread, green smoothie and a sneaky coffee, head down and ground yourself in Grange Beach

#local #organic #wholefoods

 


A Mother’s Milk

Unley

Again…when I lived in Adelaide…this was my local coffee place. A short walk from where I worked and great because the staff knew me. I didn’t have to order. My coffee guy knew.

Baked Eggs is my favourite breakfast item. Lunch time I can’t go past the Beetroot Salad.  When I brought a friend, I’d often convince them to go halvies in the figlets on sourdough. Unfortunately, I don’t think this is on the menu anymore. But Baked Eggs are. And you go here for the coffee as much as the food. These guys LOVE and appreciate their coffee and you can really taste the difference. It does get quite noisy during the busy times, so if you’re looking for a place for a conversation, find a table out the back or outside on the street.

Great for: Coffee, breakfast or lunch

You have to try: Baked Eggs

Why go here: If you’re not gluten free, the sour dough served with most meals is amazing!

#greatcoffee #greatservice #wholefoods

 

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Importance of Movement in Kids

In 1999 a teacher named Phil Lawler in Naperville, Illinois read an article that stated the health of US children was declining due to inactivity. Looking inside the school gym he saw a lot of kids that were in fact inactive. He decided to shift the focus of the ph

ysical Education class to cardiovascular fitness. Once a week students had to run a mile. Assessments were based on effort and reaching personal bests rather than skill. Non-athletes were allowed to train on bikes. He also brought in heart rate monitors to ensure the students were pushing themselves. “Your goal is to run your fastest mile…your average heart rate should be above 185.”

While this improved their performance within the school (lessons were re-shuffled to ensure those that required the most concentration were at the beginning of the day), since 1999 it has also made a huge impact on their results internationally. Academically this school performs way above any others in the area. In 1999 the 8th graders scored 1st in the world in science and 6th in the world in Maths. US schools as a whole ranked 18th in science and 19th in maths, with some areas scoring last in the world.

 

How does exercise improve learning and brain function?

Exercise encourages our brain to work at its optimum level, it causes nerve cells to multiply, connections between nerves are strengthened and they are also protected from damage. We get more oxygen and blood flow to the brain and a release of endorphins which are happy hormones that reduce stress and improve our mood.

In children, exercise has been shown to reduce restlessness and hyperactivity, decrease symptoms of ADHD, improve moods and immunity, and it also improves sleep which further enhances all the other benefits listed. It has also been shown to increase energy levels. Imagine if your child began the day with more energy, a better mood and was more settled. Imagine how much better their ability to learning would be.

Movement particularly from birth to 3.5 years is essential for laying down appropriate pathways for learning and development. It is how the brain learns to relate to the world around it. Movement develops optimal posture, eye movement and control through balance and co-ordination, better reading and better fine motor control which is crucial for handwriting.

 

How to get kids moving

  • Walking or riding a bike to school. Even if you live too far away to walk/ride the whole way, park a little distance from school and walk/ride the remainder
  • If there is time to watch TV in the morning, there is time to send the kids outside in the backyard. Bike riding, jumping on the trampoline, running around, kicking the footy, whatever it may be
  • Get to school early and play on the playground before going into class
  • Give them goals
    • “See how long it will take you to run around the backyard” and time them while you’re getting yourself ready. Then do it a second time and see if they can beat their time
    • “Go outside and see if you can get 10 goals” or “See how many goals you can get in a row” (Basketball, soccer, football)
  • Organise friends to walk/ride with before or to school
  • Ask them what activities they like and incorporate these into the daily or weekly routine
  • Get the family up 20 minutes earlier to ensure there is a little more time before school

While exercise in the morning is the best time for learning, any time is better than not at all. Even after school limiting screen time is so important for many reasons besides getting the body moving more.

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