Riverland Professionals Series – Elyse Steed

I am asked on a daily basis for referrals to other professionals in the area. This is the second in a series of blog posts dedicated to professionals around the Riverland, whose skills and qualifications complement services received at Santosha.

For our next profile, I am pleased to introduce Elyse Steed, physiotherapist. Elyse is the owner of Just Move Physio in Renmark. Elyse and I share many mutual patients and while I haven’t personally had an appointment with her (yet!), the feedback I receive from her approach is constantly positive.


What is your profession? What areas do you have qualifications and training in? 

I’m a Physiotherapist, I did my Bachelor of Physiotherapy at UniSA between 2006 and 2009.

Sine then I’ve done lots of different professional development courses in Australia and in the UK based on my clinical interests of orthopedic rehabilitation, persistent pain and running training.

Most of my extra manual therapy courses have been in light touch techniques Strain Counter Strain and more recently Craniosacral Therapy.

What does your job involve on a daily basis?

In the morning I always start by getting my outside waiting room ready and path tidied up ready for the day. This is followed by general admin jobs like checking emails/messages, reconciling, returning phone calls and juggling client appointments around.

Then I’ll have my list of clients for the day, which can vary hugely depending on who is in. My time with clients generally consists of listening/interviewing them in regards to their complaint followed by a physical assessment before treatment. I place a huge emphasis on education as part of my treatment so I spend a lot of time explaining things to people, at the moment I’m loving my new anatomy app or Explain Pain to do this. After education treatment time will usually involve manual therapy and exercise prescription.

During my breaks and end of day there’s always case notes to be done which are definitely the worst part of the job.

How did you become interested in Physiotherapy?

I decided I wanted to be a Physio in year 8 due to visiting the physio several times with my own sports injuries. I thought it would be pretty good to be the person who helps people get back to sport. Before getting to uni I wasn’t really aware of how big the profession was outside of sport because that was my only experience.

What is your biggest life achievement?

At this stage I’m most proud that Jack and I took the plunge to pack up here in Renmark and head away on our year long adventure in Europe, where we travelled and worked in our professions. It’s probably the riskiest and most challenging things I’ve done, but the learning that came from it has had such a huge influence on me as a person and professional.

What is one thing you can help clients with (that the general population may not realise)?

Ooh tough one, for me probably that I can help them to understand their pain and how things other than mechanical loading affect it. I spend a lot of time explaining how stress affects pain; I believe that understanding is a really powerful tool to managing you own body.

Where are you located?

I work from my home clinic Just Move Physio at 536 Kulkyne Street, Renmark West. It’s really cool because I have a lovely bright space in the clinic but I’ve also got heaps of outside space where I can observe and retrain people to move which is so important.

What do you enjoying doing in your spare time?

I love to be outdoors, especially in my garden or on my bike. I have an 8 month year old puppy so I spend a lot of time walking her now. I’ve always been involved in netball and basketball but that’s just finished so I might get a bit of free time. Most of my family is here or in Adelaide and I’m very lucky that I see a lot of them too.

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Recipe – Switchel, A Refreshing Summertime Drink

Switchel is an old-fashioned drink, the origins of which are hard to pinpoint. Dairy farmers in Vermont in the US, the Caribbean or Amish communities? Either which way it doesn’t matter to me. One batch and I’m hooked!

The health benefits of each ingredient are listed below the recipe, however at first glance the mix is full of electrolytes, great for digestion, refreshing, anti-inflammatory and delicious!

I liked the sound of it so much that I made a double batch straight away.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup Apple Cider Vinegar (make sure it has ‘the mother’)
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup (or honey)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger (2 tsp ground ginger)
  • Pinch of salt
  • ½ lemon (cut into quarters)

Method

  1. In a clean jar (approximately 1 litre) mix together the vinegar, maple syrup, ginger and salt.
  2. Squeeze the lemon quarters into the jar and then drop lemons into the mix.
  3. Fill to 1 litre with water and refrigerate for at least four hours (or overnight).
  4. Remove and discard the lemon.
  5. You can either shake the grated ginger and drink, or allow it to settle to the bottom.
  6. Drink on its own, with mixed with soda water for a refreshing beverage, or topped up with hot water for a warm cup of tea.

* Make sure you rinse your mouth out with water after finishing. The acidity of the vinegar may affect tooth enamel.

🍏 Apple cider vinegar has a myriad of benefits. Most of these benefits are from anecdotal reports, but still there are too many of them to ignore. Some of these benefits include: relief from heartburn and reflux, improved digestion and reduced bloating, constipation relief, reduced muscle stiffness, balanced blood sugar levels and more.

🔥 Ginger is also well-known for its healing properties. Most of all, it is anti-inflammatory and very settling for the stomach, used often in nausea relief, morning sickness, seasickness and the like.

🍯 Maple syrup and honey may be high in sugar, in their pure form (unheated, untreated) they contain many beneficial vitamins and minerals. Honey is also antibacterial.

🍋 Lemons are high in vitamin C, an antioxidant important for good health and wellbeing, and also potassium. They are alkaline when inside the body. Alkaline foods are important to reduce acidity which is responsible for many of our diseases such as cancer and arthritis. Liminoids (beneficial chemicals) in citrus also have anti-cancer properties.

🌊 Salt has had a bad rap in recent times. Truth is we need a bit of salt. Good quality, well-sourced, unrefined salt contains trace minerals and electrolytes which are essential for all functions of the human body, including but not limited to the immune system, hormones for your thyroid, adrenal gland and reproduction and also brain function.

Make it today!

I highly suggest you make a batch. It may become your favourite summertime drink! Apple cider vinegar is always available in the Santosha clinic. We also stock locally sourced honey, sometimes good quality salt (but can order in if it’s not on the shelf), organic ginger is available at our local Foodland and lemons, well lemons grow on trees!

Let me know what you think.

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Riverland Professionals Series – Georgia Tsanavaras

I am asked on a daily basis for referrals to other professionals in the area. This is the first in a series of blog posts dedicated to professionals around the Riverland, whose skills and qualifications complement services received at Santosha.

For our first profile, I am pleased to introduce Georgia Tzanavaras, remedial massage therapist, Pilates instructor and tennis coach. Georgia is the owner of Wellness Pilates in Renmark. She has an amazing knowledge of the human body, how it works and how to get the most out of it.


What is your profession? What areas do you have qualifications and training in? 

I currently teach Physical Education and Pilates Movement and I am a Remedial Massage therapist. I hold a Master Trainer Certification with Australian Institute of Fitness and I am a Certified Tennis Coach (Club Professional) with Tennis Australia. I am also registered with the Teachers Registration Board in SA.

At a very young age my passion for Exercise and Sport led me to decide that I would like to follow a career that involves movement and teach sport. I studied Sports Science and Physical Education at the Kapodestrian University of Athens and specialised in Tennis.

I worked for several years overseas with schools, sporting clubs and gyms before I came to Australia. By that time movement through the Pilates Method and it’s benefits for athletes and for general wellbeing had already been in my thoughts. I was introduced to the Pilates world overseas via seminars.

When I came to Australia I decided to study Pilates through the Pilates Method Association (APMA) and I currently hold a Diploma in Pilates Movement Therapy. I started my own Pilates Practice in 2006 whilst I was working part time for the Education Department.

Ever since my passion for my practice grew and I dedicated more time in educating my clients about the benefits of Pilates Movement. I decided to extend my clinical knowledge to a “hands on” through Massage Therapy to further assist people with chronic pain and I studied Remedial Massage therapy.

I was rewarded with the Diploma in Remedial Massage in 2012 and I have combined Pilates and Remedial Massage in my Practice ever since.

What does your job involve on a daily basis?

On a daily basis I teach Pilates at my Practice “Wellness Pilates” in a small or bigger group classes and I see clients in between classes for Remedial Massage Therapy.

 

What is your biggest life achievement?

My biggest achievement is growing my family in Australia. I have two beautiful daughters, Maria and Yianna that fill my life with joy every day.

At a younger age, I played Volley ball at professional level (overseas) and reached the National level as a Tennis Player.

What is one thing you can help clients with (that the general population may not realise)?

I can help people with emotional and physical pain through Pilates breathing and exercise as well Massage Therapy. My main goal is to help people take their Wellbeing in their own hands.

Where are you located?

I am located in 53 James Ave Renmark, near the public library on the river front. All information is also available through my website: www.wellnesspilates.com.au

What do you enjoying doing in your spare time?

In my spare time I enjoy walking at the beach and spending quality time with my family.

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Sympathetic Dominance

Imagine you’re sitting, scrolling through Facebook or your emails and someone lets a tiger into the room. What would you feel and what would you do? Naturally I would expect a few things such as:

  • A beating heart
  • A rush of adrenalin through your arms and legs (tingling, pulsing, shaking)
  • Increased breathing
  • Lack of focus

This is your “fight or flight” response. You’re either going to stay and wrestle the tiger to the ground. Or you’re going to run for your life. Either way you need your body to:

  • Open your blood vessels to provide more blood flow to your arms and legs so you have the strength to fight or run
  • Increase your heart rate so you can pump that blood around
  • Increase your blood pressure as the blood pumps around
  • Increase your breathing rate so you have enough oxygen for those muscles
  • Tighten and tense neck and shoulder muscles

At the same time your body stops or changes the balance of:

  • Immune system function – fighting off that virus someone has just coughed into the air is not as much of a threat to you as the tiger
  • Hormones – its not important to be making babies when there’s a tiger around
  • Digestion – Digesting food is not important when you’re about to be something else’s food
  • Sleep – it’s not safe to fall asleep otherwise the tiger will get you or your family

Everything is aimed at survival

This is driven, controlled and stimulated by the sympathetic nervous system.

These changes also happen in our everyday lives. It’s what helps to keep our body in balance. These changes happen when the boss puts pressure on our work output, when the kids test their boundaries, when we argue, whenever we feel pressure in life and believe it or not, the very action of sitting at a desk is actually a stress on our body.

To be fair to our sympathetic nervous system also helps out in positive situations. It helps us to keep our blood sugars in balance, our blood pressure even so we don’t get dizzy when we stand up, it dulls down loud noises and protects our eyes from bright lights. This also helps us to survive as these are vital functions for our body to maintain homeostasis (balance).

 

Perception of pressure is stress

Stress stimulates the ‘fight or flight’ mechanism in our body.

When these stressors continue our body spends more and more time in “fight or flight” until that is our new normal. We spend our lives on edge. Waiting for something to happen. This is sympathetic dominance and it begins to manifest in other ways:

  • Lower immunity – frequent colds and flus
  • Digestive system upsets – diarrhoea, constipation, gas, bloating, food intolerances
  • Hormone issues – irregular cycles, polycystic ovaries, infertility, heavy and painful periods, long or short cycles

Sympathetic dominance has far reaching effects on the body.

Other stressors grouped into the Triad of Health include:

Physical/Structural

  • Over-exercising
  • Poor posture
  • Sitting a desk all day
  • Screen time including ipads, mobile phones, laptop computers

Mental/Emotional

  • Unfulfilling relationships
  • Turning up to a job each day that we hate
  • Self-esteem issues
  • Unresolved childhood traumas

Biochemical/nutritional

  • Poor diet high in processed sugars and processed foods
  • Nutritional deficiencies such as zinc, magnesium and B vitamins
  • Toxins such as those in fast food, cosmetics and other personal care products, the environment or medications
  • Dehydration

So what can you do about this?

As I have explained in the Health Triad blog post, all health conditions are best approached from all sides of the triangle: physical/structural, mental/emotional and biochemical/nutritional.

Reducing physical and structural stressors using exercises to reverse poor posture, participating in light exercise rather than vigorous exercise everyday, stretches to counteract the negative effects of sitting at a desk all day and of course, chiropractic adjustments will all help to keep the body physically well.

Dealing with unresolved stress with methods such as meditation, NeuroEmotional Technique, taking time out for yourself each day, getting some sunshine, participating in hobbies you enjoy or spending time with friends are all good to reduce our mental/emotional stress.

Reducing the toxic load on our bodies through natural cleaning products, organic personal care products (don’t put anything on your skin you wouldn’t put in your mouth) and eating organic foods where possible will help with biochemical stress. Drinking plenty of water, which means 30mL per kilogram of body weight (1.8L for a 60kg person) each day helps to flush out toxins and keeps us feeling fresh. Plenty of fresh fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds and well-sourced meats, rather than junky, processed packaged food which is full of chemicals is important to reduce biochemical and nutritional stress on our bodies.

I have just completed my Practitioner Certification in the SD Protocol. Please let me know if you have any more questions about sympathetic dominance.

Below is a video from Dr Wayne Todd, developer of the SD Protocol:

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Easter Hot Cross Biscuits

Hot Cross Biscuits

I love hot cross buns. Who doesn’t really. Since finding out my body loves life a little more when there’s a little less gluten in it, I have been trying my hand at gluten free hot cross buns each Easter.

However, another blow to my hot cross taste buds came with the results of a food intolerance blood spot test. My body is also not so happy with bakers yeast and brewers yeast, which now rules out any GF breads. Happy tummy, happy me.

But in the lead up to Easter, those spicy buns really get to me. So this year I had an idea: Hot cross biscuits!

Truth be told, they’re just biscuits. But they’re GF, can be DF or vegan with substitution, yeast free to keep my belly happy and quite low in sugar. And I’ve added in spices, sultanas and the crosses on top!

Before I make my next point, there is nothing wrong with gluten free flour. It’s easy, pre-mixed for what you want and comes in many different varieties depending on what you’re making: bread, pizza bases, cakes, etc. So long as there are no ingredients that could possibly cause allergies (potato starch affects some tummies) it’s all good. However, GF flour is still often based on grains, some of which have been found to be inflammatory (check out Grain Brain by Dr David Perlmutter). And there are so many other options out there and I think there’s a lot to say for experimentation.

Some grain-free flours include:

  • Buckwheat
  • Quinoa
  • Coconut
  • Almond
  • Arrowroot
  • Tapioca

Each one has it’s different properties which make it better suited to some recipes than others. That’s a blog post for another day…

Here they are:

Hot Cross Biscuits

Ingredients

  • 1+1/4 cup buckwheat flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 cup butter (coconut oil for DF/vegan)
  • 1/2 cup coconut sugar
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla powder
  • 1 egg (1 chia/flax ‘egg’ for vegan)
  • 1/3 cup sultanas
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp clove powder

Method

  1. Mix buckwheat, salt, baking soda, vanilla powder and spices in a bowl.
  2. In a separate bowl, cream the butter/coconut oil and sugar until fluffy.
  3. Blend in ‘egg’.
  4. Mix the dry ingredients with the wet ones and the sultanas. Here I used my hands to really mix it together.
  5. As the buckwheat has no gluten to glue the biccies together (and your insides…gluten does that by the way) pop the mixture into the fridge for about 20 minutes to firm up.
  6. Now you can preheat the oven to 175*, line your tray with baking paper and pop the kettle on ready to make a cuppa to have with your fresh biccies.
  7. Divide the mixture into 10-15 biscuits. The photo below is a division into 10 but next time I would do maybe 15 and get them lasting longer.
  8. Bake for 12-15 minutes until golden on the edges.

Optional are the crosses. I just did that so I felt more like I was eating the real deal and for aesthetics. The crosses are made with 40g buckwheat flour, 50g water, 1/4 tsp olive oil and a pinch of salt. Mix it all up in a blender of some sort (I used a bullet) and pipe it onto the biscuits.

You could also make the choc chip hot cross biscuits with either choc chips or cacao nibs. That insightful food intolerance test I did also showed up a slight reaction to cacao, so I decided to minimise my exposure and save it for Easter Sunday.

10 freshly baked Hot Cross Biscuits

Cup of tea with a Hot Cross Biscuit

Cup of tea with a Hot Cross Biscuit. My actual morning tea this morning! 🙂


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The Natural Way to Healthy Hormones – Event

Kasey Wilson Healthy Hormones

Tuesday September 27th at 7pm

Santosha Health & Wellbeing Centre
58 Renmark Avenue, Renmark

Investment: $20

Kasey Willson is a naturopath, nutritionist, writer and speaker who is passionate about educating women to live healthier, happier lives. Kasey runs a busy naturopath clinic in Adelaide, South Australia where she supports women to achieve their hormone health goals.

Kasey’s new book “Balanced – The Natural Way To Healthy Hormones” leaves no stone unturned in helping you tackle your hormone imbalances. As part of this launch she is making a special visit to the Riverland to have a chat about keeping your Hormones Healthy, naturally.

In this 45 minute session Kasey will cover topics such as:

  • How hormone imbalance can contribute to skin breakouts, period problems, low energy, mood swings and stubborn fat gain.
  • The important causes of hormone imbalance.
  • Steps to regain healthy hormones.
To secure your place call Santosha on 8586 4222
or click here to send an email.
Kasey incorporates both nutritional and herbal medicine in her patients individualised treatment plans and believes diet and lifestyle also play a fundamental role in reaching and maintaining optimal health.
Through her clinic, writing and speaking presentations, Kasey aims is to educate women about the innate healing power of the body.  She has a passion to guide women along the holistic path to reach hormonal balance and the benefits this brings to overall health and happiness.
For more information on Kasey visit her website My Health My Happiness.
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5 Ingredients In My Pantry

Sea salt, dulse and Nutritional Yeast

Sea salt, dulse and nutritional yeast

There’s a healthy eating secret that will help you lose weight, gain more energy, reduce digestive upsets and help you live longer. Seems too good to be true doesn’t it? It’s not.

Do you want to know the secret?

Eat real food. There’s an actual diet for that. It’s called the JERF diet. Just. Eat. Real. Food.

Here’s where people get confused though. You can only eat fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, meat and anything else that’s not packaged, processed or comes in a box. Confusing? “But if you don’t eat bread and cereal for breakfast, what do you have?” “But what do you have on your vegetables?” “Where does the flavour come from?” are some of the questions.

The problem with packaged and processed food is that it’s been enhanced, usually chemically. It sounds like a conspiracy theory, but big food companies do employ food scientists to make sure you eat lots of their food and you keep coming back for more. Often these foods will trigger parts of your brain that leave you wanting more, more, more! Because it “tastes” so good!

Switching to a real food diet, low in added sugar, salt, additives and preservatives can be hard. A big reason for this is because we’ve lost the art of flavouring our own food. Herbs and spices open up a whole new world when you begin to cook from scratch.

Now I could be here all day and just about fill an encyclopaedia (remember those big books before Google?) about all the herbs and spices and what to do with them. But for now I will share just 5 things that are in my pantry that I use to flavour my food.

These things do come in bottles and packets. However, I do try to source the most natural, most unprocessed forms.

 

Apple Cider Vinegar

If you read Bragg’s book about apple cider vinegar, it cures everything. I’m not making that claim but it’s pretty versatile. You can also read about ACV here.

What is it?

ACV is fermented apple juice. The sugar in the apples in converted to alcohol through fermentation. It is then converted to vinegar through a second fermentation process.

It is important to purchase a vinegar with the ‘mother’. A murky, cobwebby substance, usually floating on the bottom. This means the ACV hasn’t been pasturized, which destroys all the good enzymes present from the fermentation process. The ‘mother’ maintains the function and effectiveness of the vinegar.

What I use it for:

  • Dressings on salads rather than straight vinegar and definitely in place of packaged salad dressing.
  • Drinking as a tea when I’m sick. Mixed with some ginger, lemon and juice and honey, this is my go to drink for when I’ve got a cold
  • Adding to stocks and broth. When making your own broth (from marrow bones or chicken) you need to something acidic to draw the minerals out of the bone. About a tablespoon (or a big splash) is all that’s needed.

What you can use it for:

Everything mentioned above. You can also add it to you bath for detoxing,

 

A good quality sea salt

I’ve used them all: Himalayan, Celtic, Peruvian, Murray River, and more. Lately I have been tending towards the Murrary River Pink salt. This is based on a few different factors but mostly ‘food miles’ which should be a big factor in any food you consume. ‘Food miles’ relate to the distance your food has travelled from its source to your plate. The costs involved in transporting food across the planet might work out well for large companies, but for the Earth it’s costly.

But back to the salt…

What is it?

Well we all know what salt is, but why are these different? Salt in its natural form contains many minerals essential for our health. Processed ‘table salt’ has had these natural minerals stripped. It’s often bleached and then has chemicals such as anti-caking agents added to make sure it stays nice in the packaging.

Traditionally salt is obviously used to flavour things and it’s also a great preservative. We have been warned against salt because of conditions such as high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease. Like sugar, highly processed diets are high in salt because so much is added to make the food taste ok. When preparing your own food, you are in control of how much you add, which means you won’t be consuming as much.

What I use it for:

  • I sprinkle a little to flavor my veggies
  • Any recipe that calls for salt
  • When exercising I will add a tiny amount to my water for extra electrolytes

What you can use it for:

The same thing as always: flavouring your food. Just remember to find a good quality unprocessed salt, use minimal amounts and experiment with other ways to flavour your food, such as herbs and spices and the next couple of products described below.

 

Dulse

This is something that’s been in my cupboard for years, but I’m really only just getting into it. It has been recommended to me for two reasons. Firstly because I am an O blood type and dulse is beneficial for Os. It’s neutral for all other types, so don’t worry if you don’t know what your type is. Also in Ayurvedic medicine is beneficial for those with a Vata dosha. There are many online ‘find your dosha’ quizzes. The best way is to visit an Ayurvedic practitioner. But if that’s not your thing here is the first website I ever used to find mine: https://store.chopra.com/dosha-quiz

Back to dulse…

What is it?

It’s a red seaweed. Like many of these flavourings I am suggesting, it’s packed full of minerals. Lots of B vitamins, Vitamin A, C and E and lots of minerals such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. Like other sea vegetables it contains iodine which is essential for thyroid and hormone health and lacking in many of our diets. Sea vegetables also contain more bioavailable minerals, meaning they are easier for our bodies to absorb. And dulse is highly alkaline, another important factor in our overall health. Who wouldn’t eat dulse with all those benefits!?

What I use it for:

As I said, I’m really only just getting into it now. I add it to all my soups, stews and casseroles.

What you can use it for:

All things savoury: soups, stews and casseroles, stir fries, miso soup and you can also use it like a ‘salt’ for flavouring dishes like pasta.

 

Nutritional Yeast

Another Bragg’s product, Nutritional Yeast has been condemned for being a ‘yeast’, thought by some to worsen symptoms such as yeast overgrowth (also known as candida) in our body. Good news is though; this is a totally different form.

What is it?

Nutritional Yeast is different from Brewer’s Yeast (a by-product from the brewing industry, but still high in B vitamins) and Torula Yeast (grown on wood pulp). Nutritional Yeast is grown on beet and cane molasses. The yeast is an organism that feeds on sugar. Through this process it manufactures its own amino acids (building blocks for protein) and vitamins, which is what makes it so healthy for us to consume. It is harvested, washed, cleaned, dried and packaged up.

Nutritional Yeast has a full spectrum of B vitamins which are essential in times of stress, for energy, brain function, digestion and many other roles in the body. It is also very high in protein, chromium which is essential for controlling blood sugars and rich source of phosphorus.

What I use it for:

Much the same as the dulse. I use it in all my soups, stews and casseroles as an addition to or instead of salt.

What you can use it for:

It’s a great replacement for salt, if that’s what you’re looking for. It can be used to flavour gravies and sauces, on salads, to ‘salt’ your popcorn or sprinkled on veggies. I’ve even seen it listed in recipes for smoothies!

 

Hemp Oil

*This information is only for those living outside Australia. Hemp products are not for human consumption in Australia. However, if you live anywhere but Australia it is perfectly fine. As shown on the Hemp Foods Australia Website:

Hemp Oil is another recent addition to my repertoire. It contains a ratio of Omega 6 to Omega 3 of 3:1 which is a healthier ratio than many processed foods which can 20:1. Omega 3 has been touted as the best oil, but that is because our diets have been so rich in Omega 6, we needed more 3 to balance it out. The truth is Omega 6 is also important. We need these ‘good fats’ for many functions in the body including for our immune system, cardiovascular system, the health of our cells, counteracting the signs of aging and for their anti-inflammatory properties.

Hemp Seed Oil is manufactured from cold-pressing hemp seeds. It is then bottled and sent around the world for consumption, except in Australia and New Zealand where it is only for cosmetic purposes.

What I use it for:

Cosmetic purposes of course, but say I lived in another country…

I would add it to my salads and vegetables for increased fat. We need fat in our diets for the reasons listed above, but also because that’s what sends messages to our brain that tells us we’re full. Fat is also used as slower burning ‘fuel’ for our bodies.

What you can use it for:

If you live outside Australia…

In much the same way olive oil is used. It can be added to pastas, salad dressings, smoothies, shakes and vegetables. It is not recommended for heating (just like olive oil) as the heating process destroys the properties of the oil. You can however, add it after foods have been cooked.

In Australia, Hemp Seed Oil is also good for massage oils, lip balms, soaps, moisturizer and hair conditioner.

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Healthy Me Summit – Overcoming Depression and Anxiety Summit January 7-17, 2016

A Date For Your Diary…not to missed!

Joanna Rushton will be interviewing speakers from January 7-17. You can view and or listen for FREE to the interview for 24 hours from 10 AM to 9.59 AM Australian Eastern Time.

You can also check out all the incredible experts as well as interviews with individuals sharing their inspirational and uplifting personal experiences on overcoming depression and anxiety.

It’s not too late to tune in and l know the information that will be shared will be invaluable.

Register for FREE here and discover:

  • Specific foods, recipes & diet plans to reduce anxiety
  • Specific supplements to support your mood & improve brain function
  • Simple daily rituals to reduce your risk of depression & anxiety
  • How to protect yourself & your family from EMF stress at home & at work
  • Tools to improve your digestion, metabolism & hormonal balance
  • Movements and exercises to reduce anxiety & lift your mood
  • Techniques to enhance the quality of your sleep for improved rest & recovery
  • Methods to practice that will improve your relationship with yourself & others

One of the interviews in the Overcoming Depression and Anxiety Summit that I highly recommend you tuning into is Carren Smith A Soul Survivor. You will discover:

  • What Carren did to cope with the suicide of her partner
  • How Carren survived the Bali bombings
  • How Carren found the courage and will to live again

I also recommend Sally Fallon and her interview The truth about Fat, Cholesterol and Mental Health:

  • The truth about cholesterol and mental health
  • Fat soluble vitamins that are essential to optimum brain function
  • Fats that impact mental wellness

Dr Amy Myers will also be speaking on the Auto-immune Solution for Mental Health:

  • The 9 symptoms of a leaky gut
  • The 10 signs that may indicate you have a parasite infection
  • How to prevent and reverse autoimmune disorders

There are so many more valuable and inspiring interviews. Click here to see the full interview list.

Don’t forget to leave a comment in the comment box below; I’d love to hear what you thought!

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Why is Apple Cider Vinegar Better than White Vinegar?

Many mornings, particular in winter I begin my day with a cup of tea. Not black tea or herbal tea, but apple cider vinegar tea, sweetened with raw honey. ACV is one of the oldest antibacterial agents known to man. The father of medicine, Hippocrates, has been credited with its first use back in 400BC when he used it with his patients for a range of ailments.

ACV is different from the beautifully ‘clean’ and translucent range of vinegars that you will see on supermarket shelves. These clear vinegars have been heated, treated and processed which robs them of the natural health benefits. Raw, unfiltered organic apple cider vinegar is unprocessed, which allows the retention of the health benefits such as enzyme function and antibacterial properties. A good ACV can easily be recognised by its opacity, which is created by the “mother”, a cobwebby like substance that preserves the strength and effectiveness of the vinegar.

So what can you use apple cider vinegar for?

Everything apparently. According to Paul and Patricia Bragg’s book Apple Cider Vinegar – Miracle Health System, it can be used for just about anything. In their book, they list a broad range of health benefits from this amazing liquid.

Putting the information in their book together with my prior knowledge, it seems that many of these conditions are alleviated by correcting the pH of the body, which is a huge factor in many health conditions. ACV works by correcting the pH in the stomach and on the skin if used topically, which balances the whole body. (An acidic body over time “corrodes” body tissues and may lead to disease in all systems.)

Natural treatment for indigestion and heartburn

This is the most common reason I suggest ACV. In the Bragg ACV book they explain that swishing ACV in the mouth before meals will stimulate digestive enzymes. Also, many cases of indigestion, heartburn, reflux, gas and bloating are caused by low rather than too high stomach acid. The ACV helps to relieve painful indigestion by helping with the digestive process.

Pharmaceutical reflux medications can have unwanted side-effects such as weight gain, constipation and/or malabsorption syndromes, due to the stomach acid being completely neutralised. Beginning a routine of ACV tea before meals and slowly reducing reflux medication can have immense health benefits. Eliminating potential and suspected food intolerances can make significant improvements in reflux, heartburn and indigestion too.

It may help in weight loss and lowering cholesterol

ACV contains acetic acid, which was found in a Japanese study to aid in decreases in weight, BMI, visceral fat (fat around the abdominal organs), serum triglycerides and waist circumference.

It can make your skin look healthier and more youthful

The pH level of your skin aids in the detoxification process. ACV vinegar helps to normalise this pH level, assisting in detox (see facial treatment below)

Lowering blood sugar levels in Type II Diabetes

In a study published in Diabetes Care people were divided into 3 groups: diabetes, pre-diabetes and normal blood sugar levels. The vinegar was found to increase insulin sensitivity:

  • All three groups had improve blood glucose readings
  • Participants with diabetes improved their blood glucose levels by 25%
  • Participants with pre-diabetic symptoms cut their blood sugar readings by half

Burning and itching of sores, hives, allergic reactions, insect bites

Using apple cider vinegar on any sort of allergy or bite will also relieve the itching, burning and pain usually associated.

Natural relief for fungal and yeast infections, bladder and kidney infection

Athletes foot, jock itch, nappy rash, thrush and the burning and itching caused by urinary tract infections can all be relieved by a dilution of ACV and water. Adding a cup of ACV to a low, warm bath can also help.

Alternative hair rinse

The pH level of ACV is apparently close to that of your hair. It is a popular rinse with many of those who prefer the more natural hair care treatments.

ACV is rich in potassium which is essential for every cell in your body to function. Potassium deficiency can be attributed to:

  • Chronic fatigue
  • Muscle aches and pains
  • Dizziness
  • Senility
  • Morning headaches
  • Tired eyes that won’t focus
  • Poor circulation
  • High blood pressure

Other possible health issues remedied by ACV:

  • Mucus
  • Cancer
  • Prostate enlargement
  • Nose bleeds
  • Burns
  • Stiffness
  • Muscle cramps,
  • Detoxification
  • Headaches
  • Gallstones (Bragg’s have a 2 day gall bladder flush to help reduce stones)

Apple Cider Vinegar Tea

  1. Pour 2 teaspoons of apple cider vinegar in a cup and add ½-1 teaspoon of honey
  2. Half fill with room temperature or warm water*
  3. Top up with boiling water and sip slowly

*It is important not to put boiling water on honey. The heat can destroy the enzymes responsible for its healing properties. Honey should also never be ‘melted’ in the microwave or boiled. If your honey has crystallised, place the jar in a saucepan of water and heat very slowly.

Apple Cider Vinegar Facial

1. Rinse face with warm water

2. Apply a wrung-out, hot water soaked cloth to the face for 3 minute 3. Soak a thin cloth in an ACV mix (1 tbsp ACV to 1 cup water) and apply this to the face. Cover with another wrung out hot soaked cloth 4. Lay down for 10 minutes with feet elevated (couch, up the wall, bed etc.) this will increase circulation and promote lymphatic drainage 5. After 10 minutes, remove cloths and use a course towel or small face loofah and rub upwards on face. This will remove all the dead skin cells that have been soaking.

According to Paul and Patricia Bragg: “Your skin will look more youthful and will shine like a polished apple with a joyous new life.”

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