My Top Cafes in Adelaide

Changing your diet and habits is always tough. When a practitioner advises, “I would like you to avoid gluten, dairy and refined sugar for the next six weeks,” it can mean big changes. Planning meals at home and changing the contents of the pantry is a good start.

Quite often eating at home is the easy bit though. Going out to eat is different. Living in the Riverland we are limited in our options for allergen friendly take away or eating out foods. That’s a blog for another day. Heading to Adelaide for holidays, shopping or visiting family is the other time where many of my patients find it difficult to stick to these changes.

It is for this reason; I have put together a list of my favourite 5 cafes around Adelaide, in no particular order. I have tried to supply my favourite places in different directions of the city, so no matter where you’re going, it’s not too far out of the way.


Nutrition Republic Goodwood

Nutrition Republic

Goodwood

It’s hard not to leave this place a little happier than when you walked in. Oh, and feeling a little healthier too.

The atmosphere is upbeat, everyone is friendly and the selection of breakfast, brunch, lunch and snack options includes something for everyone.

Everything on the menu is made with high-quality ingredients and many of them are organic. It’s also a place where you don’t have to worry about sneaky gluten or other allergens making their way into your food.

There is outdoor and indoor seating. While they are a busy little place, I’ve never had trouble finding a table.

Great for: breakfast, brunch, lunch, snacks, coffee, whenever

You have to try: Earth Bowls, there are three flavours and I love them all

Why go here: They will convince you that healthy food can also be delicious

#glutenfree #dairyfree #greatcoffee #organic #greatservice


Organic Market and Cafe Stirling

Stirling Organic Café and Market

Stirling

Always a hive of activity, this café (with a store out the back) is a little gem in the Adelaide Hills. They are constantly busy, so I have never experienced the personalised service of some of the other cafes in this list, but that doesn’t mean they are unfriendly.

To be honest I have mostly visited during wintery drives around the hills. It’s a nurturing place to stop for a soup and a nice hot coffee, but I’m sure it’s just as refreshing in Summer as it is cosy in Winter.

The menu is seasonal, so you’ll have to drop in and see what’s available. All food is prepared daily in the kitchen along with cakes, breads and pastries from local artisan kitchens.

Great for: lunch, coffee, dessert, snacks, shopping

You have to try: I can’t say…it changes ALL the time. But I did have a really nice ABC cake once. Almond, basil and citrus. I have recreated this many time at home. A delicious combination.

Why go here: The homely feel you get when you walk in. You can also peruse the store out the back

#local #wholefoods #artesian #glutenfree #dairyfree


Argo on the Parade

Argo on The Parade

Norwood

When I lived in Adelaide, this was a little post-yoga favourite with my cousin and I. Back then we always had bacon and eggs with avocado on sour dough. A recent trip while strictly gluten-free and dairy-free actually made me appreciate the extent of their menu. It was huge! Every dietary need is catered for with countless breakfasts, brunches and lunches; pages of smoothies and juices, a fridge with bliss balls, salads and more; non-dairy milk options for coffee; and a great philosophy to go with it. Make sure you read their background at the start of the menu.

Great for: breakfast, brunch, lunch, snacks, coffee, whenever!

You have to try: Sucré-Salé smoothie

Why go here: I have never seen a bigger selection of allergen friendly foods…actually I’ve never seen a bigger menu

#glutenfree #dairyfree #paleo #healthy #greatcoffee #wholefoods


The Cooks Pantry

A Cook’s Pantry

Grange

Down at Grange, this is a great little café perfectly positioned for some good eats, a coffee, then a walk along the beach.

The menu isn’t huge, but the delicious options still make it hard to choose. They have a focus on organic, local and fresh, just the way I like it! They use McWerriton Farm free-range eggs and Paris Creek biodynamic dairy products.

As well as the breakfasts and lunches, they have a great selection of juices and smoothies.

While not gluten-free, they do bake the bread themselves using organic flours, some with spelt. There are gluten-free options.

The other novel thing about the Cook’s Pantry is the cooking classes. While I’ll never had the opportunity to participate if they’re food philosophy (and taste!) is anything to go by, I imagine they’re pretty good.

The only down side is they’re not open Sundays, which is a crime for a café so close to the beach. I think they would do a great trade on Sundays, with people going for a leisurely Sunday stroll on the beach, but perhaps that’s just me!

Great for: Coffee, brunch, paired with a short walk to the beach

You have to try: Grilled Fig and Walnut Bread!

Why go here: It’s not far from the beach, so after your Fig and Walnut bread, green smoothie and a sneaky coffee, head down and ground yourself in Grange Beach

#local #organic #wholefoods

 


A Mother’s Milk

Unley

Again…when I lived in Adelaide…this was my local coffee place. A short walk from where I worked and great because the staff knew me. I didn’t have to order. My coffee guy knew.

Baked Eggs is my favourite breakfast item. Lunch time I can’t go past the Beetroot Salad.  When I brought a friend, I’d often convince them to go halvies in the figlets on sourdough. Unfortunately, I don’t think this is on the menu anymore. But Baked Eggs are. And you go here for the coffee as much as the food. These guys LOVE and appreciate their coffee and you can really taste the difference. It does get quite noisy during the busy times, so if you’re looking for a place for a conversation, find a table out the back or outside on the street.

Great for: Coffee, breakfast or lunch

You have to try: Baked Eggs

Why go here: If you’re not gluten free, the sour dough served with most meals is amazing!

#greatcoffee #greatservice #wholefoods

 

0

Importance of Movement in Kids

In 1999 a teacher named Phil Lawler in Naperville, Illinois read an article that stated the health of US children was declining due to inactivity. Looking inside the school gym he saw a lot of kids that were in fact inactive. He decided to shift the focus of the ph

ysical Education class to cardiovascular fitness. Once a week students had to run a mile. Assessments were based on effort and reaching personal bests rather than skill. Non-athletes were allowed to train on bikes. He also brought in heart rate monitors to ensure the students were pushing themselves. “Your goal is to run your fastest mile…your average heart rate should be above 185.”

While this improved their performance within the school (lessons were re-shuffled to ensure those that required the most concentration were at the beginning of the day), since 1999 it has also made a huge impact on their results internationally. Academically this school performs way above any others in the area. In 1999 the 8th graders scored 1st in the world in science and 6th in the world in Maths. US schools as a whole ranked 18th in science and 19th in maths, with some areas scoring last in the world.

 

How does exercise improve learning and brain function?

Exercise encourages our brain to work at its optimum level, it causes nerve cells to multiply, connections between nerves are strengthened and they are also protected from damage. We get more oxygen and blood flow to the brain and a release of endorphins which are happy hormones that reduce stress and improve our mood.

In children, exercise has been shown to reduce restlessness and hyperactivity, decrease symptoms of ADHD, improve moods and immunity, and it also improves sleep which further enhances all the other benefits listed. It has also been shown to increase energy levels. Imagine if your child began the day with more energy, a better mood and was more settled. Imagine how much better their ability to learning would be.

Movement particularly from birth to 3.5 years is essential for laying down appropriate pathways for learning and development. It is how the brain learns to relate to the world around it. Movement develops optimal posture, eye movement and control through balance and co-ordination, better reading and better fine motor control which is crucial for handwriting.

 

How to get kids moving

  • Walking or riding a bike to school. Even if you live too far away to walk/ride the whole way, park a little distance from school and walk/ride the remainder
  • If there is time to watch TV in the morning, there is time to send the kids outside in the backyard. Bike riding, jumping on the trampoline, running around, kicking the footy, whatever it may be
  • Get to school early and play on the playground before going into class
  • Give them goals
    • “See how long it will take you to run around the backyard” and time them while you’re getting yourself ready. Then do it a second time and see if they can beat their time
    • “Go outside and see if you can get 10 goals” or “See how many goals you can get in a row” (Basketball, soccer, football)
  • Organise friends to walk/ride with before or to school
  • Ask them what activities they like and incorporate these into the daily or weekly routine
  • Get the family up 20 minutes earlier to ensure there is a little more time before school

While exercise in the morning is the best time for learning, any time is better than not at all. Even after school limiting screen time is so important for many reasons besides getting the body moving more.

0

Macronutrients for Kids

MacronutrientsNutrients are foods that we need for energy, growth and bodily functions. ‘Macro’ means large, so ‘macronutrients’ are needed in large amounts in our body. ‘Micro‘ means small. Micronutrients are required in small amounts in our body and they include vitamins and minerals.

Macronutrients include:

  • Protein
  • Fat
  • Carbohydrate

There are ‘healthy’ and ‘unhealthy’ types of each of these groups.

Many children are missing out on the protein and fat groups, particularly at breakfast time. Throughout the day they are also consuming more of the ‘unhealthy’ types than ‘healthy’ types, particularly when it comes to fat.

Protein…

…is essential for growing children. It is used for muscles, tendons, organs, skin, hormones, enzymes and neurotransmitters (brain chemicals). With the running around, focusing and thinking, communicating and learning children do at school, adequate protein is hugely important to optimise their school performance. Increasing protein at breakfast time and in their lunchboxes is critical. The usual breakfast of cereal or toast, followed up by some fruit, then a vegemite sandwich at lunch won’t contain near sufficient protein for your child’s learning capabilities. Adding an egg to breakfast, some seeds (nuts when outside of school) or a container of dip such as hummus will make sure they start the day right. Eggs are a perfect snack and can be eaten whole, or made into patties, muffins or quiches that are bite size and perfect for lunch boxes.

Fat…

…is an essential macronutrient for brain and nervous system development. The types of fats that are in snack are foods are trans-fats or hydrogenated fats. These are the ‘unhealthy’ fats and can be found in biscuits (sweet and savoury!), snack foods, store bought cakes and muffins, chips, margarine, salad dressings,  and in high amounts in take away foods. Trans fats increase our risk of high cholesterol and heart disease, which many mistakenly believe doesn’t matter in kids as “they’re still young”. But with the rates of obesity rising, heart disease in children is also increasing. “Healthy” fats are generally unprocessed. Olive oil, coconut oil, oil from fish and plants such as avocado are all good for you.

Carbohydrates…

…are also best consumed in their most unprocessed form. The best type of carbs? Vegetables! 🙂 The worst type? Sugar 🙁  Processed cereals such as Nutri-grain, Coco-pops and Froot-loops, which are popular with the kids are extremely processed, contain large amount of sugar and minimal protein and fat. While Weet-bix is lower in the sugar count, it is unfortunately also unbalanced in macronutrient status. Mueslis containing nuts and seeds, eggs and wholemeal toast with toppings higher in fat and protein are much better alternatives at breakfast time.

Give it a try!

It does take some experimenting and trial and error due to the fussy nature of some children. But the long term health benefits and good habits beginning early most definitely do pay off. Not just in health but behaviour, academic performance and emotional stability.

0

Sympathetic Dominance

Imagine you’re sitting, scrolling through Facebook or your emails and someone lets a tiger into the room. What would you feel and what would you do? Naturally I would expect a few things such as:

  • A beating heart
  • A rush of adrenalin through your arms and legs (tingling, pulsing, shaking)
  • Increased breathing
  • Lack of focus

This is your “fight or flight” response. You’re either going to stay and wrestle the tiger to the ground. Or you’re going to run for your life. Either way you need your body to:

  • Open your blood vessels to provide more blood flow to your arms and legs so you have the strength to fight or run
  • Increase your heart rate so you can pump that blood around
  • Increase your blood pressure as the blood pumps around
  • Increase your breathing rate so you have enough oxygen for those muscles
  • Tighten and tense neck and shoulder muscles

At the same time your body stops or changes the balance of:

  • Immune system function – fighting off that virus someone has just coughed into the air is not as much of a threat to you as the tiger
  • Hormones – its not important to be making babies when there’s a tiger around
  • Digestion – Digesting food is not important when you’re about to be something else’s food
  • Sleep – it’s not safe to fall asleep otherwise the tiger will get you or your family

Everything is aimed at survival

This is driven, controlled and stimulated by the sympathetic nervous system.

These changes also happen in our everyday lives. It’s what helps to keep our body in balance. These changes happen when the boss puts pressure on our work output, when the kids test their boundaries, when we argue, whenever we feel pressure in life and believe it or not, the very action of sitting at a desk is actually a stress on our body.

To be fair to our sympathetic nervous system also helps out in positive situations. It helps us to keep our blood sugars in balance, our blood pressure even so we don’t get dizzy when we stand up, it dulls down loud noises and protects our eyes from bright lights. This also helps us to survive as these are vital functions for our body to maintain homeostasis (balance).

 

Perception of pressure is stress

Stress stimulates the ‘fight or flight’ mechanism in our body.

When these stressors continue our body spends more and more time in “fight or flight” until that is our new normal. We spend our lives on edge. Waiting for something to happen. This is sympathetic dominance and it begins to manifest in other ways:

  • Lower immunity – frequent colds and flus
  • Digestive system upsets – diarrhoea, constipation, gas, bloating, food intolerances
  • Hormone issues – irregular cycles, polycystic ovaries, infertility, heavy and painful periods, long or short cycles

Sympathetic dominance has far reaching effects on the body.

Other stressors grouped into the Triad of Health include:

Physical/Structural

  • Over-exercising
  • Poor posture
  • Sitting a desk all day
  • Screen time including ipads, mobile phones, laptop computers

Mental/Emotional

  • Unfulfilling relationships
  • Turning up to a job each day that we hate
  • Self-esteem issues
  • Unresolved childhood traumas

Biochemical/nutritional

  • Poor diet high in processed sugars and processed foods
  • Nutritional deficiencies such as zinc, magnesium and B vitamins
  • Toxins such as those in fast food, cosmetics and other personal care products, the environment or medications
  • Dehydration

So what can you do about this?

As I have explained in the Health Triad blog post, all health conditions are best approached from all sides of the triangle: physical/structural, mental/emotional and biochemical/nutritional.

Reducing physical and structural stressors using exercises to reverse poor posture, participating in light exercise rather than vigorous exercise everyday, stretches to counteract the negative effects of sitting at a desk all day and of course, chiropractic adjustments will all help to keep the body physically well.

Dealing with unresolved stress with methods such as meditation, NeuroEmotional Technique, taking time out for yourself each day, getting some sunshine, participating in hobbies you enjoy or spending time with friends are all good to reduce our mental/emotional stress.

Reducing the toxic load on our bodies through natural cleaning products, organic personal care products (don’t put anything on your skin you wouldn’t put in your mouth) and eating organic foods where possible will help with biochemical stress. Drinking plenty of water, which means 30mL per kilogram of body weight (1.8L for a 60kg person) each day helps to flush out toxins and keeps us feeling fresh. Plenty of fresh fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds and well-sourced meats, rather than junky, processed packaged food which is full of chemicals is important to reduce biochemical and nutritional stress on our bodies.

I have just completed my Practitioner Certification in the SD Protocol. Please let me know if you have any more questions about sympathetic dominance.

Below is a video from Dr Wayne Todd, developer of the SD Protocol:

0

Easter Hot Cross Biscuits

Hot Cross Biscuits

I love hot cross buns. Who doesn’t really. Since finding out my body loves life a little more when there’s a little less gluten in it, I have been trying my hand at gluten free hot cross buns each Easter.

However, another blow to my hot cross taste buds came with the results of a food intolerance blood spot test. My body is also not so happy with bakers yeast and brewers yeast, which now rules out any GF breads. Happy tummy, happy me.

But in the lead up to Easter, those spicy buns really get to me. So this year I had an idea: Hot cross biscuits!

Truth be told, they’re just biscuits. But they’re GF, can be DF or vegan with substitution, yeast free to keep my belly happy and quite low in sugar. And I’ve added in spices, sultanas and the crosses on top!

Before I make my next point, there is nothing wrong with gluten free flour. It’s easy, pre-mixed for what you want and comes in many different varieties depending on what you’re making: bread, pizza bases, cakes, etc. So long as there are no ingredients that could possibly cause allergies (potato starch affects some tummies) it’s all good. However, GF flour is still often based on grains, some of which have been found to be inflammatory (check out Grain Brain by Dr David Perlmutter). And there are so many other options out there and I think there’s a lot to say for experimentation.

Some grain-free flours include:

  • Buckwheat
  • Quinoa
  • Coconut
  • Almond
  • Arrowroot
  • Tapioca

Each one has it’s different properties which make it better suited to some recipes than others. That’s a blog post for another day…

Here they are:

Hot Cross Biscuits

Ingredients

  • 1+1/4 cup buckwheat flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 cup butter (coconut oil for DF/vegan)
  • 1/2 cup coconut sugar
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla powder
  • 1 egg (1 chia/flax ‘egg’ for vegan)
  • 1/3 cup sultanas
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp clove powder

Method

  1. Mix buckwheat, salt, baking soda, vanilla powder and spices in a bowl.
  2. In a separate bowl, cream the butter/coconut oil and sugar until fluffy.
  3. Blend in ‘egg’.
  4. Mix the dry ingredients with the wet ones and the sultanas. Here I used my hands to really mix it together.
  5. As the buckwheat has no gluten to glue the biccies together (and your insides…gluten does that by the way) pop the mixture into the fridge for about 20 minutes to firm up.
  6. Now you can preheat the oven to 175*, line your tray with baking paper and pop the kettle on ready to make a cuppa to have with your fresh biccies.
  7. Divide the mixture into 10-15 biscuits. The photo below is a division into 10 but next time I would do maybe 15 and get them lasting longer.
  8. Bake for 12-15 minutes until golden on the edges.

Optional are the crosses. I just did that so I felt more like I was eating the real deal and for aesthetics. The crosses are made with 40g buckwheat flour, 50g water, 1/4 tsp olive oil and a pinch of salt. Mix it all up in a blender of some sort (I used a bullet) and pipe it onto the biscuits.

You could also make the choc chip hot cross biscuits with either choc chips or cacao nibs. That insightful food intolerance test I did also showed up a slight reaction to cacao, so I decided to minimise my exposure and save it for Easter Sunday.

10 freshly baked Hot Cross Biscuits

Cup of tea with a Hot Cross Biscuit

Cup of tea with a Hot Cross Biscuit. My actual morning tea this morning! 🙂


0

Background Concepts and Dynamics of NET

Have you experienced NET? Have you tried to explain it to a friend…”you hold your arm up and they say words and I don’t know, it just makes me feel better.
Here is a great video explaining the concepts of NET. So if you’ve been wondering what it’s all about and how it works, or experienced the positive effects and would like to know more…take a look here!

Summary

  • Founded by Dr Scott Walker and co-deveoped by Dr Deb Walker
  • Taught for the first time in May 1988
  • There are currently over 8000 practitioner who use this technique
  • “NET is a tool that can help improve many behavioural and physical conditions using a methodology of finding and removing neurological imbalances, related to the physiology if unresolved stress.”
  • “Neuro-Emotional Complex: A subjective mal-adaption syndrome adopted by the human organism in response to a real or perceived threat.”
  • NEC’s are the patients emotional reality. Think about how you feel after a nightmare, you wake up with a racing heart, but the dream isn’t real. You are still having a physiological response.
  • After we process an emotional experience, its normal for the body to come back into balance. This does not always happen.
  • Muscles that are previously ‘strong’ will test weak when saying a non-congruent statement. This has been scientifically validated by Dr Daniel Monti.*
  • We are NOT talking to the body, asking the body questions or predicting the future!

 

Published research about NET

A pilot randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy of exercise, spinal manipulation, and neuro emotional technique for the treatment of pregnancy-related low back pain
Caroline Peterson, DC, PhD, MPH, LDM, Mitchell Haas, DC, MA and W. Thomas Gregory, MD
Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, 2012 20:18

A case series evaluating the accuracy of manual muscle testing for predicting fetal sex
Kristopher B. Peterson, DC, Caroline D. Peterson, DC, PhD, MPH, CPM
Journal of Chiropractic Medicine, 2012 11, 1-6

The influence of a biopsychosocial-based treatment approach to primary overt hypothyroidism: a protocol for a pilot study
Benjamin T. Brown, Rod Bonello, Henry Pollard, Petra Graham
Trials 2010, 11:106 doi:10.1186/1745-6215-11-106

A retrospective analysis of self-reported symptoms from 761 consecutive patients presenting to a Neuro Emotional Technique chiropractic clinic.
Bablis P. et al.
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice 2009 doi:10.1016/j.ctc[2009.02.005

A randomised controlled trial of the Neuro Emotional Technique (NET) for childhood Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): a protocol.
Fay Karpouzis, Henry Pollard, Rod Bonello
Trials 2009, 10:6 doi:10.1186/1745-6215-10-6

The Use of Traditional Chinese Medicine Principles in Chiropractic Technique
Bejamin T. Brown, Rod Benello, and Henry Pollard
Chiropractic Journal of Australia 2008; 38: 18-26

Treating Spider Phobia Using Neuro Emotional Technique: Findings from a Pilot Study
Anne M. Jensen, Adaikalavan Ramasamy
The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine Volume 15, Number 12, 2009, pp. 1363–1374 DOI: 10.1089=acm.2008.0595

Anxiety & Depression Profile of 188 Consecutive New Patients Presenting to a Neuro Emotional Technique Practitioner
Peter Bablis, Henry Pollard
The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine Volume 14, Number 9, 2008, DOI:10.1089/acm.2007.0805

Separation anxiety disorder in a 13-year-old boy managed by the Neuro Emotional Technique as a biopsychosocial intervention.
Fay Karpouzis, Grad Dip Chiro, DO, Henry Pollard, PhD, Rod Bonello, MHA
Journal of Chiropractic Medicine 2008, 7, 101-106

Neuro Emotional Technique for the treatment of trigger point sensitivity in chronic neck pain sufferers: A controlled clinical trial.
Henry P. Pollard , Peter Bablis, and Rod Bonello.
Chiropractic & Osteopathy 2008, 16:4

Short Term Correlates of the Neuro Emotional Technique for Cancer-Related Traumatic Stress Symptoms: A Pilot Case Series
Daniel A. Monti, Marie E. Stoner, Gail Zivin and Martha Schlesinger
Journal of Cancer Survivorship (2007) 1: 161-166

The Organization of The Stress Response and its Relevance to Chiropractors: A Commentary
Katie Hardy & Henry Pollard
Chiropractic & Osteopathy 2006 14:25.

Can the Ileocecal Valve Point Predict Low Back Pain Using Manual Muscle Testing?
Henry P. Pollard, Peter Bablis, and Rod Bonello
Chiropractic Journal of Australia 2006 36: 58-62.

Commentary: The Ileocecal Valve Point and Muscle Testing: A Possible Mechanism of Action 
Pollard H., Bablis P., Bonello R.
Chiropractic Journal of Australia 2006; 36:122-6

Biopsychosocial Model of Pain and Its Relevance to Chiropractors
Henry P. Pollard, Katie E. Hardy, Deborah Curtin
Chiropractic Journal of Australia vol 36 Number 3, Sept. 2006

Resolution of Anovulation Infertility Using Neuro Emotional Technique: A Report of 3 Cases
Bablis P., Pollard H., and Monti D.
Chiropractic Journal ofAustralia SPR 2006 (5:1): 13-26.

Two Reports of Resolution of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome-Induced Anovulation in Females Receiving Neuro Emotional Technique
Peter Bablis, Henry Pollard, and Andrew McHardy
Chiropractic Journal of Australia 2006 36: 2-8.

Reflections on The Type “O” Disorder
Pollard H.
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics 2005; 28: 547.e1-547.e9.

The Biopsychosocial Model and Hypothyroidism
Benjamin T. Brown*, Rod Bonello and Henry Pollard
Chiropractic & Osteopathy 2005, 13:5 doi:10.1186/1746-1340-13-5

Are Chronic Low Back Pain Outcomes improved with Co-Management of Concurrent Depression?
Middleton P., Pollard H. Chiropractic & Osteopathy 2005; 13: 8.

Practitioner Perceptions of Emotions associated with Pain: A Survey
Walker S., Bablis P., Pollard H., McHardy A.
Journal of Chiropractic Medicine 2005 Mar; 4(1): 11-8.

Interexaminer Reliability Of The Deltoid And Psoas Muscle Test
Henry Pollard, DC, PhD, Bronwyn Lakay, MChiro, Frances Tucker, MChiro, Brett Watson, MChiro, and Peter Bablis, DC
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 2005 Jan;28(1):52-6

Hypothyroidism: A New Model for Conservative Management in Two Cases
Peter Bablis and Henry Pollard
Chiropractic Journal of Australia 2004; 34: 11-18

The Somatovisceral Reflex: How Important for the “Type O” Condition?
Henry Pollard DC, PhD
Chiropractic Journal of Australia 2004; 34: 93-102.

*Scientific Validation of the Mind/Body Paradigm & Muscle Testing
Daniel A. Monti, John Sinnott, Marc Marchese, Elsabeth J. S. Kunkle and Jeffrey M. Greeson
Perceptual and Motor Skills 1999, 88, 1019-1028.

The Effects of Spinal Manipulation on the Intensity of Emotional Arousal in Phobic Subjects Exposed to a Threat Stimulus: A Randomized, Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial
Kristopher B. Peterson, D.C.
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 1997; 20: 602-6

A preliminary inquiry into manual muscle testing response in phobic and control subjects exposed to threatening stimuli.
Kristopher B. Peterson, D.C.
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 1996:19(5):310-6

Two Cases of Spinal Manipulation Performed while the Patient Contemplated an Associated Stress Event: The Effect of the Manipulation/Contemplation on Serum Cholesterol Levels in Hypercholesterolemic Subjects
Kristopher B. Peterson, D.C.
Chiropractic Technique 1995;7 55-59.

0
Page 2 of 5 12345