Riverland Professionals Series – Amy Martinson

I am asked on a daily basis for referrals to other professionals in the area. Here is the next in a series of blog posts dedicated to professionals around the Riverland, whose skills and qualifications complement services received at Santosha.

For our next profile, I am pleased to introduce Amy Martinson, Kinesiologist. Amy became interested in kinesiology through NeuroEmotional Technique and Applied Kinesiology sessions at Santosha. She had the determination to say, “This is what I want to do!” and found a course that she was able to do. While there are definitely differences in the kinesiology that Amy uses, compared to the kinesiology that I use, many of these techniques have the same outcome: Reduced stress, better wellbeing, happier and healthier people. Amy has started Shared Space in Renmark, where she consults from.

What is your profession? What areas do you have qualifications and training in? 

Kinesiologist and Neuro Trainer! In 2015-16 I studied with the College of Neuro Training to complete both CIV in Kinesiology and in Neuro Training. I’m now studying the Diploma majoring in Adaptive Neurology.

What does your job involve on a daily basis?

I work part time and my days vary from week to week to fit in with clients and my own little people. I also do the book work for my husband’s business, so on any given day I could be wearing a different hat.

How did you become interested in Kinesiology?

Catherine at Santosha introduced to me Applied Kinesiology which she uses as part of her chiropractic care. For me it was a lot like a magic trick where I was completely fascinated by the Neuro Emotional Technique and I got results. I couldn’t study Applied Kinesiology without a Bachelor Degree and then a friend told me she visited a Kinesiologist/Neuro Trainer in Adelaide. I went to one session and decided on walking out of there that I needed to learn this for me and my family if for no one else. It’s been an incredible roller-coaster, still is.

What is your biggest life achievement?

This one will mean so many different things to different people. Once upon a time I would have started to list everything  I have, what I’ve done or where I’ve been. My children, ages 10, 8 and 5 come to mind but I didn’t achieve them either, they are my blessings! I’m proud of lots of things but if I had to hold anything in the highest regard it would be how much I have grown as a person in the last 5 years, in the last 10 years.

What is one thing you can help clients with (that the general population may not realise)?

To look at and respond to stress differently.

But first, stress can be mental, emotional, physical and spiritual. Examples of early signs of stress include habitual negative thinking, low self-esteem, feelings of overwhelm, mood swings, depression, anxiety, brain fog, lack of direction or motivation, teary, reactive to even the smallest challenges in life, headaches, lack of appetite, sugar cravings, and muscular aches and pains.

We’re always going to have stress in our lives. And a certain level of stress is actually required for us to get off our butts to do anything. It’s when the balance is tipped that we’re unable to process effectively, and use that part of our brain that helps us find new ideas and solutions to our problems.

Kinesiology with Neuro Training is about changing patterns and becoming aware of the patterns we’re using to cope with our problems (refer signs above).

The more we use a pattern of thinking or behaviour the more likely it becomes our habit.

An easy way to understand Kinesiology with Neuro Training is to liken it to brain training. It’s building stronger neurological connections for better response to mental, emotional and physical stress on the mind/body.

Where are you located?

​12 James Avenue, Renmark Tuesday to Thursday.
50 Bookpurnong Terrace, Loxton alternate Mondays.​

What do you enjoying doing in your spare time?

Being a mum is a big part of what I do day to day. I Love catching up with friends. I Love Coffee! I Love spending summer evenings on the river with my family and friends. I feel better for walking in the mornings. I enjoy travel and experiencing other cultures especially their food. Any movies or books are usually period stuff or autobiography’s on women of different cultural struggles.

Amy and her family

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Holistic Health Care and the Triad of Health

Holistic Health Care

When it comes to the treatment of a health condition, a simple way of making sure a holistic approach is being applied is to your health, is to ensure the three sides of the Triad of Health are balanced.

This Triad of Health includes:

  • Structural or physical
  • Chemical or nutritional
  • Emotional or mental

If only one or two aspects of this triad are addressed you may not ever reach 100% healing success.

Holistic” and “holism” are words that are gaining in popularity in the world of health. The Macquarie Encyclopaedic Dictionary states that holistic medicine is “an approach which treats the whole person rather than just dealing with manifestations of a disease or symptoms.” I am proud to practice chiropractic techniques which allow me to fulfil this definition every day at Santosha.

If we use the simple example of a headache: This headache may be caused by your five-a-day coffee habit (chemical), stress over a recent relationship breakdown (emotional) combined with dysfunction in your neck (physical). But if only the neck dysfunction is treated by chiropractic adjustments or stretches, or you just kick your coffee habit, while the headaches may diminish they will not go completely until you take care of the emotional patterns you are also dealing with. In the same way, counselling may help you emotionally and reduce some headaches, if you are still consuming copious amounts of coffee, the problem will likely still persist.

On the other hand, dealing with your headache by chemical means, such as ‘pain killers’, while chemically altering your body to not feel the pain, still leaves the emotional and structural problems behind. These emotional and structural issues may then manifest as other health problems further down the track.

As I mentioned earlier, I am proud that my approach and qualifications allow me to address all three sides of the health triad:

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