The Natural Way to Healthy Hormones – Event

Kasey Wilson Healthy Hormones

Tuesday September 27th at 7pm

Santosha Health & Wellbeing Centre
58 Renmark Avenue, Renmark

Investment: $20

Kasey Willson is a naturopath, nutritionist, writer and speaker who is passionate about educating women to live healthier, happier lives. Kasey runs a busy naturopath clinic in Adelaide, South Australia where she supports women to achieve their hormone health goals.

Kasey’s new book “Balanced – The Natural Way To Healthy Hormones” leaves no stone unturned in helping you tackle your hormone imbalances. As part of this launch she is making a special visit to the Riverland to have a chat about keeping your Hormones Healthy, naturally.

In this 45 minute session Kasey will cover topics such as:

  • How hormone imbalance can contribute to skin breakouts, period problems, low energy, mood swings and stubborn fat gain.
  • The important causes of hormone imbalance.
  • Steps to regain healthy hormones.
To secure your place call Santosha on 8586 4222
or click here to send an email.
Kasey incorporates both nutritional and herbal medicine in her patients individualised treatment plans and believes diet and lifestyle also play a fundamental role in reaching and maintaining optimal health.
Through her clinic, writing and speaking presentations, Kasey aims is to educate women about the innate healing power of the body.  She has a passion to guide women along the holistic path to reach hormonal balance and the benefits this brings to overall health and happiness.
For more information on Kasey visit her website My Health My Happiness.
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5 Ingredients In My Pantry

Sea salt, dulse and Nutritional Yeast

Sea salt, dulse and nutritional yeast

There’s a healthy eating secret that will help you lose weight, gain more energy, reduce digestive upsets and help you live longer. Seems too good to be true doesn’t it? It’s not.

Do you want to know the secret?

Eat real food. There’s an actual diet for that. It’s called the JERF diet. Just. Eat. Real. Food.

Here’s where people get confused though. You can only eat fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, meat and anything else that’s not packaged, processed or comes in a box. Confusing? “But if you don’t eat bread and cereal for breakfast, what do you have?” “But what do you have on your vegetables?” “Where does the flavour come from?” are some of the questions.

The problem with packaged and processed food is that it’s been enhanced, usually chemically. It sounds like a conspiracy theory, but big food companies do employ food scientists to make sure you eat lots of their food and you keep coming back for more. Often these foods will trigger parts of your brain that leave you wanting more, more, more! Because it “tastes” so good!

Switching to a real food diet, low in added sugar, salt, additives and preservatives can be hard. A big reason for this is because we’ve lost the art of flavouring our own food. Herbs and spices open up a whole new world when you begin to cook from scratch.

Now I could be here all day and just about fill an encyclopaedia (remember those big books before Google?) about all the herbs and spices and what to do with them. But for now I will share just 5 things that are in my pantry that I use to flavour my food.

These things do come in bottles and packets. However, I do try to source the most natural, most unprocessed forms.

 

Apple Cider Vinegar

If you read Bragg’s book about apple cider vinegar, it cures everything. I’m not making that claim but it’s pretty versatile. You can also read about ACV here.

What is it?

ACV is fermented apple juice. The sugar in the apples in converted to alcohol through fermentation. It is then converted to vinegar through a second fermentation process.

It is important to purchase a vinegar with the ‘mother’. A murky, cobwebby substance, usually floating on the bottom. This means the ACV hasn’t been pasturized, which destroys all the good enzymes present from the fermentation process. The ‘mother’ maintains the function and effectiveness of the vinegar.

What I use it for:

  • Dressings on salads rather than straight vinegar and definitely in place of packaged salad dressing.
  • Drinking as a tea when I’m sick. Mixed with some ginger, lemon and juice and honey, this is my go to drink for when I’ve got a cold
  • Adding to stocks and broth. When making your own broth (from marrow bones or chicken) you need to something acidic to draw the minerals out of the bone. About a tablespoon (or a big splash) is all that’s needed.

What you can use it for:

Everything mentioned above. You can also add it to you bath for detoxing,

 

A good quality sea salt

I’ve used them all: Himalayan, Celtic, Peruvian, Murray River, and more. Lately I have been tending towards the Murrary River Pink salt. This is based on a few different factors but mostly ‘food miles’ which should be a big factor in any food you consume. ‘Food miles’ relate to the distance your food has travelled from its source to your plate. The costs involved in transporting food across the planet might work out well for large companies, but for the Earth it’s costly.

But back to the salt…

What is it?

Well we all know what salt is, but why are these different? Salt in its natural form contains many minerals essential for our health. Processed ‘table salt’ has had these natural minerals stripped. It’s often bleached and then has chemicals such as anti-caking agents added to make sure it stays nice in the packaging.

Traditionally salt is obviously used to flavour things and it’s also a great preservative. We have been warned against salt because of conditions such as high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease. Like sugar, highly processed diets are high in salt because so much is added to make the food taste ok. When preparing your own food, you are in control of how much you add, which means you won’t be consuming as much.

What I use it for:

  • I sprinkle a little to flavor my veggies
  • Any recipe that calls for salt
  • When exercising I will add a tiny amount to my water for extra electrolytes

What you can use it for:

The same thing as always: flavouring your food. Just remember to find a good quality unprocessed salt, use minimal amounts and experiment with other ways to flavour your food, such as herbs and spices and the next couple of products described below.

 

Dulse

This is something that’s been in my cupboard for years, but I’m really only just getting into it. It has been recommended to me for two reasons. Firstly because I am an O blood type and dulse is beneficial for Os. It’s neutral for all other types, so don’t worry if you don’t know what your type is. Also in Ayurvedic medicine is beneficial for those with a Vata dosha. There are many online ‘find your dosha’ quizzes. The best way is to visit an Ayurvedic practitioner. But if that’s not your thing here is the first website I ever used to find mine: https://store.chopra.com/dosha-quiz

Back to dulse…

What is it?

It’s a red seaweed. Like many of these flavourings I am suggesting, it’s packed full of minerals. Lots of B vitamins, Vitamin A, C and E and lots of minerals such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. Like other sea vegetables it contains iodine which is essential for thyroid and hormone health and lacking in many of our diets. Sea vegetables also contain more bioavailable minerals, meaning they are easier for our bodies to absorb. And dulse is highly alkaline, another important factor in our overall health. Who wouldn’t eat dulse with all those benefits!?

What I use it for:

As I said, I’m really only just getting into it now. I add it to all my soups, stews and casseroles.

What you can use it for:

All things savoury: soups, stews and casseroles, stir fries, miso soup and you can also use it like a ‘salt’ for flavouring dishes like pasta.

 

Nutritional Yeast

Another Bragg’s product, Nutritional Yeast has been condemned for being a ‘yeast’, thought by some to worsen symptoms such as yeast overgrowth (also known as candida) in our body. Good news is though; this is a totally different form.

What is it?

Nutritional Yeast is different from Brewer’s Yeast (a by-product from the brewing industry, but still high in B vitamins) and Torula Yeast (grown on wood pulp). Nutritional Yeast is grown on beet and cane molasses. The yeast is an organism that feeds on sugar. Through this process it manufactures its own amino acids (building blocks for protein) and vitamins, which is what makes it so healthy for us to consume. It is harvested, washed, cleaned, dried and packaged up.

Nutritional Yeast has a full spectrum of B vitamins which are essential in times of stress, for energy, brain function, digestion and many other roles in the body. It is also very high in protein, chromium which is essential for controlling blood sugars and rich source of phosphorus.

What I use it for:

Much the same as the dulse. I use it in all my soups, stews and casseroles as an addition to or instead of salt.

What you can use it for:

It’s a great replacement for salt, if that’s what you’re looking for. It can be used to flavour gravies and sauces, on salads, to ‘salt’ your popcorn or sprinkled on veggies. I’ve even seen it listed in recipes for smoothies!

 

Hemp Oil

*This information is only for those living outside Australia. Hemp products are not for human consumption in Australia. However, if you live anywhere but Australia it is perfectly fine. As shown on the Hemp Foods Australia Website:

Hemp Oil is another recent addition to my repertoire. It contains a ratio of Omega 6 to Omega 3 of 3:1 which is a healthier ratio than many processed foods which can 20:1. Omega 3 has been touted as the best oil, but that is because our diets have been so rich in Omega 6, we needed more 3 to balance it out. The truth is Omega 6 is also important. We need these ‘good fats’ for many functions in the body including for our immune system, cardiovascular system, the health of our cells, counteracting the signs of aging and for their anti-inflammatory properties.

Hemp Seed Oil is manufactured from cold-pressing hemp seeds. It is then bottled and sent around the world for consumption, except in Australia and New Zealand where it is only for cosmetic purposes.

What I use it for:

Cosmetic purposes of course, but say I lived in another country…

I would add it to my salads and vegetables for increased fat. We need fat in our diets for the reasons listed above, but also because that’s what sends messages to our brain that tells us we’re full. Fat is also used as slower burning ‘fuel’ for our bodies.

What you can use it for:

If you live outside Australia…

In much the same way olive oil is used. It can be added to pastas, salad dressings, smoothies, shakes and vegetables. It is not recommended for heating (just like olive oil) as the heating process destroys the properties of the oil. You can however, add it after foods have been cooked.

In Australia, Hemp Seed Oil is also good for massage oils, lip balms, soaps, moisturizer and hair conditioner.

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Child and Maternal Health Month Wrap-up

Empower Nuture Nourish

Due to an influx of pregnant patients (we have had 7 patients give birth in 2 months!!) I was inspired to dedicate a month of information sessions aimed to educate and empower parents to give their children the best start to life. After setting this intention, things fell into place. 3 speakers just about fell in my lap, so planning began for Santosha’s Child and Maternal Health Month in Feburary. Each speaker focussed on a different aspect of children’s and family health. We covered birth, breastfeeding, maternal mental health, childhood development and raising a healthy family through diet and nutrition. The information was really well-received and we had some great feedback.

The month started off with Louise McCartney. She covered many aspects of 20th century health from why our diets are making us sick, to things to avoid and why ‘gut health’ is so important. We were at capacity for Louise’s talk and I am still investigating the possibility of her coming back for a second presentation. Some feedback from the presentation:

“Louise is extremely informative, providing information that is hard to access in mainstream medicine.”
“Very informative.”
“I have heard Louise speak 4 times now and every time I attend one of her sessions I learn something new or remember the importance of something.”

Louise McCartney

 

Our second speaker was Rebecca Kubenk, a lactation consultant and expert on Tongue-ties, speaking about breastfeeding and tongue-tie. This was information that is hard to find! Rebecca is extremely knowledgable on these topics and those who came went away with a sense of empowerment.

“Having had 2 children with ties, I learn something every time i talk to Rebecca. I wish I knew when my kids were babies, what i know now.”

On the same weekend Sarah Menadue from RDGP spoke to the mums about mental health particularly around having a new baby. She shared information about where to turn to in times of need and different services available in the Riverland.

Sarah Menadue

 

Anna Siebert, an Adelaide based doula (see her blog post 8 things you might not know about doulas). Anna spoke about all things birth, particuarly things you may not hear in your traditional birthing class. She covered a history of birthing practices, why we do what we do and how to have your best birth (yes! it can be enjoyable). We received a lot of verbal feedback (nothing in writing) but the general consensus was that Anna’s knowledge was extremely empowering and those who attended felt more prepared for their upcoming birth and labour.

Anna Siebert

The last weekend in February I presented to a small group on “Optimising Learning and Development”. Discussion was focussed on the normal milestones of development from infancy to childhood and why each of those are so important. I also explained what may impact these normal stages and how to prevent this from happening in children. This presentation was aimed at parents, but is extremely important information for any care-giver or teacher. Some feedback received:

“Catherine spoke very well and made us feel comfortable enough to ask questions and comment.”
“I found it very informative.”

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Healthy Me Summit – Overcoming Depression and Anxiety Summit January 7-17, 2016

A Date For Your Diary…not to missed!

Joanna Rushton will be interviewing speakers from January 7-17. You can view and or listen for FREE to the interview for 24 hours from 10 AM to 9.59 AM Australian Eastern Time.

You can also check out all the incredible experts as well as interviews with individuals sharing their inspirational and uplifting personal experiences on overcoming depression and anxiety.

It’s not too late to tune in and l know the information that will be shared will be invaluable.

Register for FREE here and discover:

  • Specific foods, recipes & diet plans to reduce anxiety
  • Specific supplements to support your mood & improve brain function
  • Simple daily rituals to reduce your risk of depression & anxiety
  • How to protect yourself & your family from EMF stress at home & at work
  • Tools to improve your digestion, metabolism & hormonal balance
  • Movements and exercises to reduce anxiety & lift your mood
  • Techniques to enhance the quality of your sleep for improved rest & recovery
  • Methods to practice that will improve your relationship with yourself & others

One of the interviews in the Overcoming Depression and Anxiety Summit that I highly recommend you tuning into is Carren Smith A Soul Survivor. You will discover:

  • What Carren did to cope with the suicide of her partner
  • How Carren survived the Bali bombings
  • How Carren found the courage and will to live again

I also recommend Sally Fallon and her interview The truth about Fat, Cholesterol and Mental Health:

  • The truth about cholesterol and mental health
  • Fat soluble vitamins that are essential to optimum brain function
  • Fats that impact mental wellness

Dr Amy Myers will also be speaking on the Auto-immune Solution for Mental Health:

  • The 9 symptoms of a leaky gut
  • The 10 signs that may indicate you have a parasite infection
  • How to prevent and reverse autoimmune disorders

There are so many more valuable and inspiring interviews. Click here to see the full interview list.

Don’t forget to leave a comment in the comment box below; I’d love to hear what you thought!

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Why setting goals is important and how to do them properly

As we all know, New Years is a popular time for goal setting and intentions. But there’s also the same old story of having good intentions and that is all.

Now (or even earlier) is a great time to start thinking about your goals for next year, because if you’re one of these people that needs to “start Monday” or “wait until the 1st of the month” then you definitely need to be ready when January 1st hits.

Goals should be more than just, “I will eat healthier in 2016” or “I will exercise at least 5 times a week” because the most important thing in goal setting is not the goal itself, but the WHY. You don’t start exercising 5 times a week because you love exercise. You exercise to feel better, lose weight, tone your body, increase your energy, or whatever it is in your personal circumstance. So when you’re out running you’re not thinking about the running but the end goal of how you will feel at the end.

“If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favorable.” Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Why Setting Goals is Important

You Need Direction

Seneca, a Roman statesman had it right when he pulled out this little piece of sailing wisdom. If you don’t know where you want to be in your life, then nothing that comes your way will be useful to you. Setting goals allows you to get 100% clear on what you want and where you want to be, so when opportunity arises you can grab it with both hands.

You Get Clear

Sometimes when I begin to write down what I want, as the list progresses it develops and changes. What I thought I wanted becomes very different when I work through the whys and the hows. Taking the time to make a list and detailing how and when and why will draw out the real priorities and make you realise what’s actually important.

You Find Motivation

This does relate to point number 1 in that motivation comes from direction. Being able to find what you want and break it down into simple action steps makes many tasks far less daunting and when you start and feel as though you’ve made progress, the motivation grows.

 

SMART Goals

Tips for Creating Great Goals

SMART

Using the SMART acronym is a great way to know if you’re doing your goals right:

S – Specific. Are they specific? “I will exercise 3 times a week for at least 3 minutes, every Monday, Wednesday and Friday morning,” compared to: “I will exercise more.” Using who, where, what, when and how helps here.

M – Measureable. Can you measure the outcome? “I will increase my savings by $100 each month,” compared to “Save more money.” How can you measure the outcome. You can also measure in smaller action steps.

A – Achievable. While I encourage you to reach for the stars, are your goals really achievable? “I will increase my business income by 10% each month of 2016,” compared to “I want $1,000,000 in my bank account tomorrow.” Unless of course you’re nearly a millionaire. In that case, go ahead! Manifest millions. Can also stand for Attainable.

R – Realistic. Can you really keep up with it? “I will add one serve of vegetables into my diet each day,” compared with “I will stop eating McDonalds and KFC for breakfast, lunch and tea and only drink green smoothies and broth.”

T – Timely. Can you achieve this in the time you have set? “I will lose 2kg a week for the next 6 months,” compared with “I will lose 10kg in two weeks.” Also can mean Time-bound. “I will start writing the book I’ve also wanted to write” doesn’t give you an end point. “I will write at least 5 pages of the book each week and be finished the first draft by March” gives you steps and an end-point.

Break it Down

When setting my goals or new moon intentions I always have rough categories they each fit into. Sometimes one category will have more than others, but this changes and adapts over time. For example: at the moment I am exercising 6 times a week. It has become a habit and it’s working well for me at the moment. So when I set my next list of intentions or goals, exercise won’t be a big focus for me.

My categories generally include:
• Career and work
• Relationships
• Health and wellness
• Exercise
• Finance and money
• Spiritual and self

Acknowledging the Year (or Month or Day) Gone by

Achievements not matter how small are important to recognise. Being grateful for what you have and what has happened is a really important step in the goal-setting process. While you may be setting goals for the first time and therefore may feel like you have been wasting your time, there is probably more than you have achieved than you realise. You will also have much to be grateful for when you sit down and consider.

Take Action Now

Write down at least one thing, if not more, that you can do TODAY to get your goals going. As I explained above, breaking the goals down into small action steps makes them infinitely easier. But ensure there is one simple thing you can do to step towards your end goal.

Feel It

While writing your goals visualise them, feel them and imagine them. How is it going to feel when you achieve them? What will happen? How will you behave? (Bonus tip: Start acting like your dreams have already come true.) Spend some time (day)dreaming up the whole thing. Visualise how you will feel in your new fit body. Imagine how you will dress when you land that dream job. Dream about the holiday you will take when you are earning all that cash. Concentrating on the feelings of when it happens will help to keep you motivated and trick your brain into thinking you have achieved everything now. This is a very important step!

Never stop dreaming

Now, as a treat for sticking with me through these tips, here’s a little bonus present for you all. These are the workbooks that I have used for the past few years to do my goal-setting, intentioning and visualising. These magic books by Leonie Dawson ask all the right questions in the right way, a simple to use, fun format.
The easiest way is to download the ebooks and print them yourself. But Leonie has a huge list of products to help you make your wildest dreams come true. So get downloading and get ahead for your new years resolutions.

Leonie Dawson

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Chocolate Smoothie

Chocolate Smoothie


This chocolate smoothie, packed full of goodness went down really well with the kids. I saw a few sneaking back for a second serve. The first time I tried it was in the Thermomix. I made the full amount and it came out to over a litre of smoothie, so it will need to be scaled down if you’re not feeding a family. The second time I tried it, I did scale it down and used the Magic Bullet, not the thermie. It took a long time to blend and even then there were chunks of dates and some ice. The Thermomix is second to none when it comes to processing something as hard as ice, but it can be done if you’re patient and don’t mind chunks. Obviously I would recommend the Thermomix for all it’s other functions. If you’re interested in taking a look at the Thermomix and perhaps even hosting a no-obligation demo, send us an email and we’ll pass on Larissa’s details.

What you need:

  • 5 Medjool dates
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds
  • 200g ice
  • 30g raw cacao powder
  • 200g frozen banana (about 2)
  • 200g avocado (about 2)
  • 120g baby spinach (this is a lot of baby spinach, but it blends down)
  • 600g water or coconut water
  • 100g activated almonds (if you don’t have activated, soak them overnight in filtered water)

What to do:

  1. Process the almonds, chia seeds and dates
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and process until smooth
  3. Serve with a thick straw, this is a thick smoothie

Tips:

Larissa tells me ice breaks everything up and makes it smoother. I’m going to start doing this is more of my smoothies.

Bananas are apparently easier to digest once they’ve been frozen. I always have frozen bananas in my freezer. Once they start to turn a little bit black, peel them, pop them in a ziplock bag and they’ll always be ready.

Coconut water has a lot of sugar, natural sugar, but it’s still sweet. If your after a bit of sweetness use all coconut water, but gradually swap out the coconut for filtered water.

 

This recipe comes from Jo Whitton’s Quirky Cooking, a brilliant book to accompany your Thermomix. See more on her website.

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